Unintegrated Primitive Reflexes May Be Hindering Your Life

I came across the subject of Primitive Reflexes a few times in the last year, and really took an interest about a month ago when I decided to do a course online about it.

Doing anything in my body has always been hard for me, and learning about the unintegrated reflexes made me realise why.

It so happened that the only person trained in NZ on the Rhythmic Movement website, lives 8 mins away from me I’ve had one session so far with her, she’s a kineseologist, and she worked getting my body switched on to achieve success integrating the reflexes.

These reflexes can be integrated at any age in life.

It appears from all my symptoms and the journey in my life, I have an active fear paralysis reflex and actiive moro reflex. It all makes so much sense now. Just even reading the course has me in tears because I relate to it all so much.

Reflexes

A reflex is an automatic, repetitive movement that is instinctual and aids in development, as well as development of the brain. We have many reflexes, like blinking, but the one’s I want to talk about are primitive reflexes. These are reflexes that are formed in the womb and hopefully become inactive in the toddler stage.

Sucking, and grasping of the hands, are primitive reflexes. These reflexes, and others, are designed to transform into more sophisticated movements, and therefore become integrated. They form the foundation, and development of balance, mobility, hearing, speaking, vision, learning and communicating.

Unintegrated Reflexes

There are many reasons why these reflexes don’t phase out, ie: lack of movement as a child, stress in the mother in pregnancy, illness, environmental toxins and many more reasons. They can be retriggered any time in life, often due to trauma and stress, and because of this, can cause a whole host of issues ranging from anxiety, ADHD, depression, learning disorders, sensory disorders, lack of confidence, extreme shyness, vision and hearing problems, addictions, autism and constantly feeling overwhelmed.

Reflex movements are the foundation of our nervous system, they originate in the brain stem, so they really are about survival, and staying unintegrated cause someone to be constantly in fight or flight. Body parts can’t move independently and freely, and can cause weak muscle tone, aches and muscle tension, fatigue, and a lot of effort to complete tasks.

Key Childhood Reflexes

Fear Paralysis Reflex

This reflex should ideally be integrated before birth and is about freezing, as in a deer in the headlights. Without integration it may cause the Moro reflex to not integrate as well.

Some long term effects of an unintegrated Fear Paralysis reflex are:

Underlying anxiety
Insecurity
Depression
Extreme shyness
Fear of groups
Fear of separation
Phobias
Withdrawal from touch
Sleep and eating disorders
and many more

Moro Reflex

Sometimes called the infant-startle reflex, this is an automatic reaction to sudden changes in stimuli, ie: bright lights, sounds, temperature, touch, movement. Unintegrated, a person can feel hypersensitive to any incoming stimulation. This can cause a change in blood pressure, cortisol and adrenaline levels, and breathing rate.

Some long term effects of an unintegrated Moro reflex are:

Poor digestion
Weak immune system
Poor balance and coordination
Difficulty adapting to change
Difficulty filtering stimuli
hyperactivity then fatigue
Difficulty with visual perception
Hypersensitivity to sound, light, touch, movement, smell
Emotional outbursts, easy to anger
and many more

Other reflexes that can be unintegrated are Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex, Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex, Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex, Spinal Galant Reflex, Oral, Hand and Foot Reflexes.

The Many Benefits Of Good Posture

Having good posture is an important part of remaining healthy. IT helps you avoid back pain and premature wear on your bones, improves lung performance, and much more. In this article, we will explain what good posture is before explaining the many benefits that it provides.

What is good posture?

Posture is the form that your body takes when you are sitting, standing, and laying down. Maintaining “good” posture is positioning your body so there is less strain placed upon your body’s muscles and ligaments when in these positions.

It requires your body to be as close to its natural shape as possible. So if you are sitting down, this would mean:

Keeping your chin up and looking forward
Keeping your shoulders back (not slouching)
Bending your knees at a right angle
Keeping your feet flat on the floor
Keeping your back straight enough that all 3 natural curves of the spine are present.

Sitting with good posture distributes weight more evenly across your muscle groups – helping you avoid neck, shoulder and back pain. It also allows you to comfortably work for longer periods and avoid some serious long-term health problems.

Having a chair with lumbar support will help you maintain good back posture.

What are the benefits of good posture?

Protects your future health

Having good posture will keep your joints correctly aligned, protecting the joint surfaces from abnormal wear-and-tear. By preventing this type of wear-and-tear, you can lower your risk of various illnesses including arthritis and postural hunchback.

It makes it easier to breathe

The diaphragm is a large muscle that is responsible for respiration. When the diaphragm moves, it changes how much pressure there is within the thorax – causing air to either enter or exit the lungs.

Posture affects breathing because it changes how much room the diaphragm has to move. If you are slouched in a chair or while walking, the diaphragm cannot contract or expand as easily, preventing you from taking deep breaths. As soon as you correct your posture, you will immediately notice how much easier it is to breathe. This is a particularly useful benefit for anyone who has a health condition that affects their breathing.

Can help prevent back pain

Developing good posture can eliminate back pain caused by stressed muscles and poor joint alignment. It does so by actively reducing the strain placed on the muscles and joints by spreading weight across the entire body. This ensures that certain muscles or joints are not overworked or damaged.

Over time, having good posture will even improve the alignment of your spine, which will improve the condition of your back and reduce the risk of back injuries. You will be less likely to suffer from herniated discs, muscle strains or other back problems.

Improved physical performance

Good posture requires the use of more muscle groups. Not only does this reduce the chances of straining a single muscle, it can lead to an improvement in overall physical performance. Having the ability to engage muscles more evenly will help you perform better during daily activities and any sports that you play.

Strengthens the core

If you have already made improvements to your sitting posture, you will have noticed that your abdominal muscles feel more engaged. Your abdominals will be “sharing the load” with your back muscles as they keep your torso stable. The more you improve your posture, the stronger your core will get, thus improving the alignment of your spine, reducing stress on your back muscles, and improving your mobility.

Makes you look more attractive

Have you ever seen an actor or actress on a talk show? Did you notice how impeccable his or her posture was? Actors and actresses concentrate on having good posture because they understand how much it affects their appearance. By sitting tall in their seat and keeping their chin up, they will look much more beautiful or handsome to the viewers at home. You will gain the same benefits as you improve your posture.

Improved digestion of food

Sitting or standing with good posture will ensure your internal organs are in their natural position. This makes it easier for the body to digest food and perform other important functions like maintaining good blood circulation.

Can improve your mood

Researchers from the University of San Francisco have discovered that having good posture can help improve a person’s mood. They found that improved posture could also increase energy levels and reduce the risk of mental illnesses like depression.

Improving your posture can deliver some amazing benefits to your health and lifestyle. If you are interested in developing good posture, talk to a chiropractor or general practitioner. You can also use online resources like NHS choices to learn more.

Ulcers – Powerful Natural Remedies Revealed!

If you had a pound for every person who has been “cured” two or more times of his ulcers, you would be a wealthy person – probably with ulcers. For some reason, totally unknown to me, ulcers are considered an ailment of the wealthy. (Probably by the same people who think money brings happiness.) Again, if you had a pound for all the low and moderate income people who suffer from ulcers, you would be able to balance the national budget. Ulcers will live on any income.

Obviously those who claim to have been “cured” several times of their ulcers are really saying that the pains have been alleviated momentarily. But this is no cure. The disease cannot be cured until the cause is known and treated. Rarely is the cause of ulcers treated, but rather the effect; that hole in the stomach called an ulcer is doused with milk, cheese, drugs, etc., and then permitted to gouge itself out and start the same painful symptoms all over again.

People who never worry do not have ulcers. People who have knowledge of what they are doing on earth and why they must do it, also rarely suffer from ulcers. Tense, worried, nervous and unhappy people are the prime target of stomach and duodenal ulcers.

M. K. had suffered from duodenal ulcers for eight years. He had been “cured” of them five times – before a state of painful collapse. He left sanatorium ten days later without a trace of his ulcer. How?

M. K. was placed upon a totally non-stimulating diet consisting almost totally of fruits and vegetables and their juices.

In addition to this, the patient consumed four glasses of cabbage juice each day. (Raw cabbage sliced and reduced to juice by means of an electric liquefier.) M. K. did not respond to the use of citrus juices and these, oranges, grape-fruits, lemons and limes, were removed from the diet. Aside from these, however, the patient was able to consume all fruits and vegetables in liquid form or in the steamed manner in which all vegetables should be cooked.

During the first five days steam (Turkish) baths were administered once a day and the full pack at night. A brisk cold-water rub was prescribed each morning. At the end of the first week, the steam baths and full packs were replaced with natural (hip) baths and stomach compresses on retiring for the night. These and only these were responsible for relieving M. K. of his ulcer within ten days. However, it is to his credit that the patient has since been able to maintain superb health. Only by finally returning to a state of complete harmony with nature, both physical and mental, was he able to overcome the root of this condition that had plagued him for eight long years. To this day, M. K. continues to drink two glasses of cabbage juice each day and he is convinced that this is largely responsible for his resistance to returning ulcers.

When There Is No Doctor

The bones that form a joint are normally congruous and in apposition to each other. When this relationship is altered due to injury, it leads to a separation of these bones, called a dislocation.

What you shouldn’t do is as important as what you should when someone has suffered a dislocation. Let’s discuss how to recognize when bones have gone astray, and the correct way to handle such an emergency.

A fracture is often mistaken for a dislocation especially if it occurs near a joint, such as the upper end of the thighbone (femur) which is near the hip joint, or the upper end of the arm bone (humerus) which is near the shoulder joint. What distinguishes the two is that a fracture is a break in the continuity of any one bone.

The elderly are more susceptible to dislocations because, with age, the muscles and ligaments that form the support system around the joints lose their tone, weakening their hold over the joints.

Other susceptible groups, especially for shoulder dislocation, are those involved in active sports like gymnastics and cricket (bowling and fielding).

SHOULDER DISLOCATION

This is the commonest site of dislocation because the socket of the shoulder joint is shallow compared to the other ball-and-socket joint – the hip, which is deeper and hence more stable. The cause is usually an injury, typically when, during a fall, the person lands on his outstretched hand (thus throwing his entire body weight on it) and the rest of his body is thrown backwards.

Symptoms:

When the two shoulders are compared, the affected one will appear flatter (the normal shoulder has a rounded outline) because the ball has shifted out its place.
There will be pain and swelling around the area, and the person will be unable to move the affected arm.

First Aid:

DO NOT

attempt to click the joint into place, especially if you are not trained in this, and the dislocation has occurred for the first time. In fact, do not even move the arm; let the person hold it in the position he finds most comfortable.
give anything by way of mouth, including a pain-killer (even if the person is yelling for it), in case anaesthesia is to be later administered at the hospital.

WHAT TO DO:

Your priority should be to transport the person to a hospital urgently. Sometimes if the circumflex nerve at the shoulder joint is injured, it could lead to paralysis of the deltoid muscles (of the shoulder), leading to an inability to raise the arm.

If time permits (while transport is being arranged) the affected hand could be supported by a cuff-and-collar sling, i.e. a bandage gauze going around the neck and the wrist, or by a triangular sling.

(At the hospital after an x-ray is taken, the bone will be set into position, very often under general anaesthesia.)

Recurrent dislocations of the shoulder, in which the shoulder keeps getting dislocated as a result of trivial injury or even an action which involves raising the arm above the shoulder are common. The reason is a tear in the tissue surrounding the joint which becomes a weak area through which the bone comes out easily.

As the frequency of such dislocations increases, the pain reduces to the point, where the person learns to click hi shoulder back into place without much ado.

HIP DISLOCATIONS

The hip joint has a deeper socket compared to the shoulder joint and has the body’s strongest ligaments surrounding it, which is why it is inherently a very stable joint. But it may dislocate as a result of a high-velocity vehicular accident. If a person sits in the front seat of a vehicle with his legs crossed at the knee, when the dashboard hits against the knee, the force is transmitted from the knee along the thighbone to the hip joint which usually dislocates the hip joint.

Symptoms:

Severe pain in the area; the person will not be able to stand on the affected leg.
The leg will appear flexed (bent) at the knee and hip.
The limb may also appear shortened.

First Aid:

DO NOT:

attempt to click the joint into place or to move the leg in any way.
give the person anything to eat or drink in case he is required to be given anaesthesia later.

WHAT TO DO:

Immediately arrange to transport the person, lying on his back and preferably in an ambulance. If treatment is delayed and the surrounding blood vessels are disrupted, the blood supply to the ball of the hip joint may be permanently cut off, leading to early wear-and-tear of the hip joint and arthritis of the hip. If the dislocation is associated with an injury to the sciatic nerve which is in close proximity to the hip it could lead to a paralysis of the foot muscles or a foot-drop. (At the hospital, under general anaesthesia, the hip will be manipulated into position or surgery may be required.)

Usually a hip dislocation is non-recurrent except in the case of an associated fracture of the socket. (In this case, to prevent re-dislocation, the fractured socket has to be reconstructed by surgery.)

SPINAL DISLOCATIONS

As a result of injury, the spine could dislocate either at the cervix (back of the neck) or in the dorso-lumbar area (the junction of the middle and lower back). It may or may not be associated with neurological deficit (paralysis).

Symptoms:

Severe pain in the area.
If there is paralysis, there may be reduced sensation or a lack of sensation below the point of injury.
If the body is paralysed below the level of injury there will be a loss of bladder and bowel movement.

First Aid:

DO NOT

delay transportation in any way.
impart any movement to the spine.

WHAT TO DO

As soon as possible, rush the person to the hospital in the position that he is lying, as a change of position could worsen his condition. In the event of paralysis below the point of injury, early treatment plays a crucial role in ultimate recovery.

OTHER DISLOCATIONS

Other superficial dislocations include those of the elbow joint, finger joints and ankle joints.

Symptoms:

Pain, swelling and an inability to move the affected joints.

First Aid:

DO NOT

attempt to click the joint into place, however easy it may seem, as an injury to a nearby nerve or blood vessel during the process could bring on long-lasting complications or could produce a fracture of a nearby bone which was not initially present.

WHAT TO DO

The elbow joint may be placed in a triangular sling to provide support to it till the person can be taken to hospital.

In case of an ankle dislocation, the victim should not be made to walk or to exert any pressure on the affected leg. He should be carried to the transport and, later, from the vehicle to the hospital.

Finger joint dislocations may appear minor but they too need the attention of an orthopaedic surgeon who will usually click them into place under local anaesthesia. However, if there are complications involved, surgery may be required.

3 Tips To Reaching Your Health and Fitness Goals With A Busy Lifestyle

Life has this sneaky way of creeping in and throwing curve balls left and right. Life will always happen. There will always be a busy day at work or family problems or relationship highs and lows or sick children. Once conflict arises, it seems like health and fitness routines go haywire. We seek comfort food or we just don’t feel like moving. These are the things that help us stay clear and balanced in both body and mind though! So what do we do when conflict smacks us in the face (and it happens to everyone so if you’re reading this – you’re not alone)? Avoiding the conflict is not reasonable because we can’t always control what comes at us. Figurine out how to navigate through any issues is what needs to happen to stay on track.

I think so many times we approach health and fitness goals with an “all or nothing” mindset. For example, you might think your day is ruined because you veered off of your diet with an unhealthy meal or snack. Or, you decided not to workout today because you couldn’t do the allotted 60 minutes that you had planned for. Instead of doing something, you may have chosen nothing at all. You gave up on day two of 30 days of clean eating. Do any of those sound familiar? It doesn’t have to be all or nothing and something is better than nothing. My tips below might give you some perspective on how to reach your health and fitness goals even when life throws you a curve ball.

My philosophy is nourish, movement, mindset. If we can work on nourishing our bodies, moving them mindfully and maintaining a healthy attitude, we can function a little better day by day, week by week, month by month and eventually get into the healthy habits on a regular basis that we need to achieve total body balance.

1. Nourish.
Focus on one small thing at a time. Start simple and work from there. Don’t expect to change your eating habits overnight. Small changes executed day after day, week after week and so on can lead to really big change. So pick one small nutrition action and practice it for one to two weeks before adding in a new change.

Examples: Work on portion control (without regard to food quality), add one colorful food in at each meal, take 15 minutes to meal prep tomorrow’s healthy food or omit your sugary after dinner snack (swap it out with a healthy alternative). You could eat slowly and chew your food completely or focus on balancing your meals so that you have protein, carbohydrate and fat at each meal. Omitting processed foods at one to two meals per day is also another great option. These are just some examples but it’s up to you to figure out which little step you can take to improve your nutrition.

2. Movement.
Take advantage of the time that you DO have. Carve out space in the small pockets of your time. We get fixated on time so often that we don’t realize that a little is always better than nothing. For example, it’s so easy to think that you have to do a workout for 30 minutes to 1 hour. Wouldn’t 15 minutes of that workout be better than nothing though? The answer is yes! So squeeze in what you can, when you can.

Get unconventional. Maybe you don’t have time to get in a “workout”. Do what you can with what you’ve got. Maybe you take the stairs that day instead of the elevator. Park in the parking space furthest away from the building (gasp!) to get some extra steps in. Stand up from your desk and walk around for a minute every 15 or 20 minutes. Run around at the playground with your kids. Movement doesn’t always have to be in the form of a straight up 30 minute HIIT workout. It can be moving and active – outside or inside. What are the ways that you could get in some more movement?

Move mindfully. Pay close attention to your body and what it’s trying to tell you. Your body and energy levels will fluctuate day by day so take advantage of more vigorous workouts when you can and also add in active recovery, lighter workouts or even yoga or stretching when necessary.

3. Mindset.
Don’t give up. Don’t throw in the towel on eating right and moving your body. It’s seems easy to take the “all or nothing” approach but that’s not necessary. Something is always better than nothing.Don’t beat yourself up! Life ebbs and flows for everyone. Take a look at where you’re at right now and what you can make work right now.

The most important thing is to honor where you’re at. Only you know what you’re capable of at this point in your life. Make sure the small steps you take are 100% doable for you and your lifestyle. Small steps over time can add up to big change.